Nicolas Dubreuille

  • Ref. 491
  • Ref. 290
  • Michelle
  • Eléa
  • Ref. 192
  • Ref. 282
  • Isaïa
  • Ref. 189
  • Ref. 185
  • Ref. 490
  • Ref. 288
  • Ref. 194
  • Ref. 289
  • Ref. 495
  • Ref. 487
  • Ellekach
  • Ellenore
  • Ref. 493
 
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  • Ref. 491
    Ref. 491
    Acrylic on paper, framed
    20 x 20 in
    Frame dimensions 25 x 25 in
  • Ref. 290
    Ref. 290
    Aluminium
    26 x 11 x 11 in
  • Michelle
    Michelle
    Print on metallic paper, diasec
    27 x 39 in
  • Eléa
    Eléa
    Print on metallic paper, diasec
    31 x 31 in
  • Ref. 192
    Ref. 192
    Acrylic on canvas
    39 x 39 in
  • Ref. 282
    Ref. 282
    Aluminium
    29 x 12 x 7 in
  • Isaïa
    Isaïa
    Print on metallic paper, diasec
    31 x 31 in

  • Ref. 189
    Ref. 189
    Acrylic on canvas
    39 x 39 in
  • Ref. 185
    Ref. 185
    Acrylic on canvas
    47 x 47 in
  • Ref. 490
    Ref. 490
    Acrylic on paper, framed
    20 x 20 in
    Frame dimensions 25 x 25 in
  • Ref. 288
    Ref. 288
    Aluminium
    26 x 9 x 8 in
  • Ref. 194
    Ref. 194
    Acrylic on canvas
    47 x 39 in
  • Ref. 289
    Ref. 289
    Aluminium
    24 x 12 x 8 in
  • Ref. 495
    Ref. 495
    Acrylic on paper
    19 x 19 in
    Frame dimensions 25 x 25 in
  • Ref. 487
    Ref. 487
    Acrylic on paper, framed
    20 x 20 in
    Frame dimensions 25 x 25 in
  • Ellekach
    Ellekach
    Print on metallic paper, diasec
    39 x 39 in
  • Ellenore
    Ellenore
    Print on metallic paper, diasec
    27 x 39 in
  • Ref. 493
    Ref. 493
    Acrylic on paper
    19 x 19 in
    Frame dimensions 25 x 25 in
Having first studied graphic design, Nico turned his attention to sculpture in the year 2000 and has since developed his own personal style, both playful and unconventional, but nevertheless part of art history. His lacquer-coated resin sculptures or acrylic drawings on rice paper bring to mind celebrated contemporary artists such as Arp, Brancusi, Calder, Etienne-Martin, Moore, Smith, etc. They are also reminiscent of Bertrand Lavier's Walt Disney Productions or could relate to minimalism, pop art and free figuration. Nico's inventiveness, his way of opening doors between these different paths, between abstraction and figuration, concept and expression, stands for creative and outstanding art. Matrix, geometric, biomorphic and totemic forms all encased within each other, the sculptures are reminiscent of individuals, animals, habitats and architectures.

The sculptural elements consist of modules or solid and curved forms with smooth surfaces. They are brought to light with monochrome and vivid, luminous colours: yellows, reds, blues, greens... These artificial, industrial colours, similar to those of sugared sweets, appear as synthetic as the resin Nicolas uses to build the structures and as the objects mass-produced by our consumer society which are similar to these unique sculptures. Nearly always pierced with holes, holes/eyes (we walk on our head but we look, see, and can be seen), holes/sexual (we are reminded of the symbolism of rings), elevations or rounded forms, the sculptures are reminiscent of untold stories (most of the time they don't have a title). With Nico's sculptures, you have to go beyond the evenness of his three-dimensional art, look through the other side and try to walk on your head.

https://nico-sculptures.com/

"After my studies in graphic design in Bordeaux, I moved to Dublin, in 1999 at the age of 23: then worked as a graphic designer for a Whisky compagny. As a self-made artist, I spent more and more time drawing and I discovered, during a several months trip to Asia and Oceania, the use of clay in New Caledonia. Back to Europe in 2002, I settled down in Milan and decided to fully dedicate myself to ceramic. I did my first solo exhibition at the Cultural Area Frida. A new trip to Asia helped me to deepen and personalize my work. Living close to Bordeaux since 2004, I've produced, in the first place, ceramics, associating a shape with a drawing. Searching for more freedom in the way to express myself, I have slowly started giving up clay to prioritize a new material: resin. It allows me to shape my drawings the way I really want it to."